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I came across this article in my reading today, Practice Self-Compassion to Improve How You Feel About Yourself, on Lifehacker and it got me thinking about the topic again. I have read about self-compassion over the years, but I have never really been able to apply it to myself. Anyone who knows me also knows I can be tremendously hard on myself. I take mistakes, missteps, failures and disagrees fully and deeply to heart. I often say that I can feel just as disappointed, embarrassed or angry about something that happened 40 or more years ago as I can about something that happened moments ago. The cold fact is, I find myself lacking in countless ways, be it personally, professionally or in any of my life roles. Because of this lack of self-esteem, I find it very difficult to practice self-compassion. How can I when I am constantly feeling that I am not living up to my own, probably impossibly high, standards.

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Noted: Brainstorming Doesn’t Work; Try This Technique via Fast Company 

 (via Career Opportunities with Douglas E. Welch » Noted: Brainstorming Doesn’t Work; Try This Technique Instead via Fast Company)
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In the neighborhood…Penstemon

 (via In the neighborhood…Penstemon | A Gardener’s Notebook)

In the neighborhood…Penstemon

(via In the neighborhood…Penstemon | A Gardener’s Notebook)

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(via My Word with Douglas E. Welch » Waiting for lunch and family)
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Back in the day, your Rolodex™ was your breadbox, your money maker and in some cases your lifeline. Today, whether you store your contacts on paper, in Gmail or some fancy CRM system, these descriptions are still valid. A lot of life and business is still about who you know. Those contacts — both online and face-to-face — are golden. While the image of the smarmy salesman making endless phone calls is stuck in many minds, using your virtual rolodex to build your career and your income is as important as it ever was. Use your rolodex for good, not evil, and you can take your career to new heights.

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(via My Word with Douglas E. Welch » Photos from Sicily Day 5)
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(via My Word with Douglas E. Welch: A Break at the Beach)
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Sometimes you might like to believe your career is a straight-line proposition. You start here, put in hours of work and you will eventually end up over there, at your goal. In the distant past, this might have been true, but today your career is filled with dead ends, mistaken shortcuts, detours and uncompleted roads that can leave you feeling trapped. Despite these fear-inducing possibilities, though, I think that these detours, these aberrations, these deviations from the norm are actually the underpinnings of a great career. Chance and happenstance might feel frightening when you are in their midst, but they can often bring you the greatest rewards.

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I was talking with a friend the other night about podcasting and getting word out about their music. They had been talking with others and their description of podcasting and recording seemed very complicated. Below are my thoughts on podcasting and how it can be very difficult to get started when “perfect” gets in the way. — Douglas Voltaire said, “The perfect is the enemy of the good.” and it seems that this has never been more true. So many people are kept from exploring the amazing uses of the Internet today, all because they let perfect get in the way.

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As we develop our careers our focus narrows more and more over the years. We find our niche and develop it more and more carefully. We specialize in fewer and fewer skills until we have our career honed to a razor-like sharpness. This has long been the way of developing a great career and yet this method holds some pitfalls. When we increasingly specialize in one narrow area, we are in danger of closing out ideas, innovations and activities from other disciplines that could lead to great advances in our career.

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(via My Word with Douglas E. Welch: I Spy, with my little eye… - PaD 7/29/07)
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On Wednesday, July 18th, I spoke to the students attending the Stephens College Summer Film Institute in Columbia, Missouri. I review the history of podcasting, its uses and a bit of the technology involved.
During this talk, I also showed 2 video interviews with some fellow podcasters from LA. These have been removed from this talk, but I plan on releasing them here, as well. Subscribe today to receive them automatically.